Born in 1969 in Shimane, Japan
Lives and works in Tokyo, Japan

Izumi KATO

education

1992
- Graduated from the Department of Oil Painting, Musashino Art University

solo shows

2017
- New Prints and Drawings, Item éditions, Paris, France
- Take Ninagawa, Tokyo, Japan

2016
- Galerie Perrotin, New York, USA

2014
- Galerie Perrotin, Paris, France
- Soft Vinyl Sculptures, CAPSULE; SUNDAY, Tokyo, Japan
- Galerie Perrotin, Hong Kong, China

2012
- SOUL UNION DELUXE, Kirishima Open-Air Museum, Kagoshima, Japan

2011
- The View from After, COMME des GARÇONS OSAKA (Six), Osaka, Japan
- Paintings and Sculptures, ARATANIURANO; NADiff Gallery, Tokyo, Japan

2010
- KATO Izumi − Journeying into Each Day, The Hakone Open-Air Museum, Kanagawa, Japan
- SOUL UNION, ARATANIURANO, Tokyo, Japan

2008
- The Riverhead, The Ueno Royal Museum Gallery, Tokyo, Japan

2007
- Dear Humans, ARATANIURANO, Tokyo, Japan
- MOKU, Takahashi Collection, Tokyo, Japan

2006
- Murata & Friends, Berlin, Germany [also ’04,’01]

2005
- HADAKA NO HITO, SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, Tokyo, Japan
- Galleria Enrico Astuni, Pietrasanta, Italy

2004
- αM PROJECT Vol.5, art space kimura ASK?, Tokyo, Japan

2003
- Ai Gallery, Tokyo, Japan [also ’01,’00,’95]
- 23GALLERY, Tokyo, Japan [also ’01,’00]

2002
- Galleria Chimera, Tokyo, Japan

2001
- Criterium 46 – Izumi Kato, Contemporary Art Gallery, Art Tower Mito, Ibaraki, Japan

1999
- SAMAZAMA NA ME 98 Izumi Kato, IBM-KAWASAKI City Gallery, Kanagawa, Japan

1998
- GALLERY LE DECO, Tokyo, Japan [also ’97, ’96]

group shows

2017
- Japanorama. New vision on art since 1970, Centre Pompidou-Metz, Metz, France (upcoming)
- THE ART SHOW – Art of the New Millennium in Taguchi Art Collection, The Museum of Modern Art Gunma, Gunma, Japan
- GLOBAL NEW ART – The Essence of Taguchi Art Collection, Woodone Museum of Art, Hiroshima, Japan
- ART VACANCES, Gallery Hiramine, Kagoshima, Japan
- PLAY, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan

2016
- Living in Figures – Izumi Kato x Chen Fei, Nizayama Art Park Power Plant Museum, Toyama, Japan
- Traces of a Dream – Selections of the Hara Museum Collection, Hara Museum ARC, Gunma, Japan
- ART VACANCES – Izumi Kato, Paramodel, Mrs. Yuki, Gallery Hiramine, Kagoshima, Japan
- TAKAHASHI COLLECTION, Kanaz Forest of Creation, Fukui, Japan
- It’s Our Permanent Collection! , Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan
- ‘'THE COLLECTION OF THE TAKAMATSU ART MUSEUM’ EXHIBITION CELEBRATING THE MUSEUM’S REOPENING A CONCISE GUIDE TO LIFE WITH JAPANESE CONTEMPORARY ART, Takamatsu Art Museum, Kagawa, Japan
- S-HOUSE Museum Project, S-HOUSE Museum, Okayama, Japan

2015
- STANCE or DISTANCE ? − Connecting Myself to the World, Contemporary Art Museum Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan
- COSMOS/INTIME La Collection Takahashi, Maison de la culture du Japon à Paris, Paris, France
- Messages – Takahashi Collection, Towada Art Center, Aomori, Japan
- TAKAHASHI COLLECTION : Mirror Neuron, Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Tokyo, Japan
- Taguchi Art Collection − A Walk around the Contemporary Art World after Paradigm Shift, The Museum of Fine Arts, Gifu, Gifu, Japan

2014
- Red Bull Music Academy Tokyo 2014, Red Bull Music Academy, Tokyo, Japan
- Rokko Meets Art 2014, Mount Rokko National Park, Hyogo, Japan
- Twentieth Anniversary Special MOT Collection: Contacts, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
- Taguchi Art Collection : TAG−TEN, Matsumoto City Museum Of Art, Nagano, Japan
- Mindfulness! – TAKAHASHI COLLECTION 2014, Nagoya City Art Museum, Aichi, Japan

2013
- Traveling Art in Mimasaka Province, Shurakuen Garden, Okayama, Japan
- Visceral Sensation – Voices So Far, So Near, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
- Wonderful My Art – Artists of the Takahashi Collection, Kawaguchiko Museum of Art, Yamanashi, Japan
- Re:Quest – Japanese Contemporary Art since the 1970s, Museum of Art, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
- MISUGOSHITEKITAMONO, sendai mediatheque, Miyagi, Japan

2012
- Parallel Far East Worlds, A4 Contemporary Arts Center, Chengdu, China
- Rokko Meets Art 2012, Mount Rokko National Park, Hyogo, Japan
- The 35th Anniversary of the National Museum of Art, Osaka: the Allure of the Collection, The National Museum of Art, Osaka, Osaka, Japan
- Double Vision: Contemporary Art from Japan, Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Moscow, Russia; Haifa Museum of Art, Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art, Haifa, Israel

2011
- Pathos and Small Narratives − Japanese Contemporary Art, Gana Art Center, Seoul, Korea
- JALAPAGOS, MITSUBISHI ESTATE ARTIUM, Fukuoka, Japan
- MOT Collection Silent narrator: on plural stories, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
- Taguchi Art Collection − Global New Art, Seiji Togo Memorial Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan
- The Most Requested Top 30 / 10 Years of Takahashi Collection, Takahashi Collection Hinode; TABLOID GALLERY, Tokyo, Japan
- Be Alive! – Selections from the Hara Museum Collection, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan
- Art in an Office, Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Aichi, Japan

2010
- Living With Art – Contemporary Art From Japan and Taiwan, Yi&C Contemporary Art, Taipei, Taiwan, China
- New Kore Shizuoka – New and Previous Collections and Art Closely Connected to Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art, Shizuoka, Japan
- Fifth Anniversary Exhibition: Garden of Painting – Japanese Art of the 00s, The National Museum of Art, Osaka, Osaka, Japan

2009
- Being Seeing Feeling – Selections from the Hara Museum Collection, Hara Museum ARC, Gunma, Japan
- Dorodoro, Doron – The Uncanny World in Folk and Contemporary Art in Asia, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima, Japan
- Long Season, Michael Ku Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan, China
- TOYOTA ART COLLECTION 2008, Kuragaike Art Salon, Toyota Kuragaike Commemorative Hall, Aichi, Japan

2008
- Forwards 08 – Daimler Awards for Contemporary Art in Germany, Japan, South Africa and USA, Daimler Contemporary Berlin, Berlin, Germany
- Kankai Pavilion Opening Exhibition – Beyond Time, Beyond Space, Hara Museum ARC, Gunma, Japan
- neoteny japan – From TAKAHASHI Collection, Kirishima Open-Air Museum, Kagoshima; Sapporo Art Museum, Hokkaido; The Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo; The Niigata Prefectural Museum of Modern Art, Niigata; Akita Museum of Modern Art, Akita; Yonago City Museum of Art, Tottori; The Museum of Art, Ehime, Ehime, Japan [–’10]
- Art Scope 2007/2008 – Faces of Existence, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan
- Selections from the Hara Museum’s Permanent Collection, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan

2007
- Venice Biennale 52nd International Art Exhibition Think with the Senses – Feel with the Mind. Art in the Present Tense curated by Robert Storr, Italian Pavilion at Giardini, Venice, Italy
- Painting as Forest: Artist as Thinker, Okazaki Mindscape Museum, Aichi, Japan
- MOT Annual 2007 – From a World as Large as Life, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

2006
- The Child, Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Aichi, Japan

2005
- GLOBAL PLAYERS – Deutsche und japanische Kunst der Gegenwart, BankART1929, Yokohama, Japan; Ludwig Forum Aachen, Aachen, Germany [’06]
- Little Boy: The Arts of Japan’s Exploding Subculture, Japan Society, New York, USA
- Izumi KATO, Junya SATO, Yuken TERUYA, 14-1 Galerie, Stuttgart, Germany

2004
- Galleria Enrico Astuni, Pietrasanta, Italy
- lonely planet, Contemporary Art Gallery, Art Tower Mito, Ibaraki, Japan
- Body, Galerie Robert Drees, Hannover, Germany

2003
- ZONE – Clairvoyants in this threatening age, Fuchu Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan
- The 1st Magical Art Exhibition ‘Magic Room’, PROJECT ROOM, Tokyo, Japan

2002
- Pro Tsubo, Theodor-Zink-Museum, Kaiserslautern, Germany; Neue Galerie Landshut, Germany [’04]
- VOCA 2002, The Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo, Japan

2000
- Four Emerging Artists, Theatres des SENS, Tokyo, Japan

1997
- ‘Bi’ and ‘Jutsu’ , Ai Gallery, Tokyo, Japan

public collection

- The Franks-Suss Collection, London, U.K.
- Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan
- Long Museum, Shanghai, China
- Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
- The Museum of Modern Art, Kamakura & Hayama, Kanagawa, Japan
- The National Museum of Art, Osaka, Osaka, Japan
- Okazaki Mindscape Museum, Aichi, Japan
- The Pigozzi Collection, Geneva, Switzerland
- S-HOUSE Museum, Okayama, Japan
- Taguchi Art Collection, Tokyo, Japan
- Takahashi Collection, Tokyo, Japan
- Takamatsu Art Museum, Kagawa, Japan
- Toyota Motor Corporation, Aichi, Japan
- Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, Aichi, Japan
- Vangi Sculpture Garden Museum, Shizuoka, Japan
- 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
 

Publications

2016
- Living in Figures - Izumi Kato x Chen Fei, Perrotin, Hong Kong

2014
- Izumi Kato: Soft Vinyl Sculptures, Izumi Kato Studio, Tokyo, Japan

2012
- IZUMI KATO EXHIBITION−SOUL UNION DELUXE, Izumi Kato Exhibition Committee, Tokyo, Japan

2011
- Izumi Kato: Paintings and Sculptures, Seigensha Art Publishing, Inc., Kyoto, Japan
- Izumi Kato − Soft Vinyl Sculptures, Izumi Kato / Linden, Tokyo, Japan

2010
- KATO Izumi − Journeying into Each Day, The Hakone Open-Air Museum, Kanagawa, Japan

2005
- Izumi Kato, Edizioni Galleria Astuni, Pietrasanta, Italy

Izumi Kato - Vinyl figurine (red)

Izumi Kato - Vinyl figurine (red)

Goodie

$47.18 Excluded VAT

Izumi Kato - Untitled 14 (Japanese paper)

Izumi Kato - Untitled 14 (Japanese paper)

Print

$1572.53 Excluded VAT

Izumi Kato - Untitled 13 (Japanese paper)

Izumi Kato - Untitled 13 (Japanese paper)

Print

$1375.97 Excluded VAT

Izumi Kato - Untitled 12 (Japanese paper)

Izumi Kato - Untitled 12 (Japanese paper)

Print

$1375.97 Excluded VAT

Izumi Kato - Untitled 11 (Arches paper)

Izumi Kato - Untitled 11 (Arches paper)

Print

$2358.8 Excluded VAT

Izumi Kato - Untitled 10, I (normal paper BFK rives)

Izumi Kato - Untitled 10, I (normal paper BFK rives)

Print

$2358.8 Excluded VAT

  • December 2016
    Geijutsu Shincho — 1 PAGE

  • November 2016
    Asahi Shimbun — 1 PAGE

  • November 2016
    Vantage — 6 PAGES

  • November 2016
    Marie Claire — 1 PAGE

  • October 2016
    Chinese Contemporary Art News — 1 PAGE

Creamier, Contemporary Art in Culture

by Yukie Kamiya

An extract from "Creamer-Contemporary Art in Culture" (Phaidon)

Izumi Kato is an artist who began painting after laying down his brush. Eschewing tools, as if to reject any reliance on the flightiness of brushwork, he applies layer upon layer of sombre-hued pigment directly with his hands, not so much to paint as to rub the colour onto the canvas. In this way, he depicts creatures with human contours, two staring eyes, a head, hands and feet. Those bold, forceful curves, throwing into relief the human shape, those organic lines, that distortion and simplifying of form, are inevitable products of painting with the hands, and as a result, Kato’s works possess a powerful presence that seems to illuminate the core of the human body.

Kato was a relative latecomer to the art world, making his debut at the age of thirty. He had worked as a manual labourer for some years, which left him with the sense of being at one with the world that comes with corporeal achievement, and a humble appreciation of his place as just anther creature of this earth.

From here he set out on a new journey of engagement with the vast realm of painting. An artist who began with the abstract, he now depicts nothing but human figures.
All Kato’s recent works are untitled, and he does not set up any specific model to paint; nor does he draft or sketch. These paintings have no narrative element. They are dialogues, creations arising from a direct, barely suppressible physical urge to touch, a trait given play by humans since the days of prehistoric cave murals. The figures sealed within the frame of the canvas seem to radiate an enigmatic aura, their undifferentiated bodies encased in thin membranes reminiscent of a budding life form in the embrace of its mother’s amniotic fluid. Kato’s is the act of capturing life through his body.

In 2005 Kato also turned to sculpture.
Deliberately avoiding materials that are easy to mould such as clay and resin, he works only in wood, carving directly. Once again he focuses consistently on human figures, chisel marks and cracks left like idiosyncrasies of the flesh.
That he always colours these roughly hewn bodies indicates that for Kato, they are in extension in his painting. Some of his works are equipped with legs or castors resembling those on desks and chairs.
Echoing Brancusi perhaps,, through the pursuit of the substance of things he has arrived at the simplification of form. He also attempts to explore the possibilities of form in different materials and textures.
Through the classical techniques of painting and sculpture, Kato reflects physicality, practicing an unrefined yet direct, shareable, real artistic expression in a contemporary world where virtual elements proliferate.

Yukie Kamiya, Gallery Director, Japan Society, New York


“Re-Quest – Japanese Contemporary Art since the 1970s”, 2013 Venue: Museum of Art, Seoul National University Published by the Japan Foundation

by Iida Shihoko

Born in 1969 in Shimane Prefecture; currently lives in Tokyo. Making his debut as an artist in the mid-90’s, Kato Izumi’s work began with paintings that recalled primitive organisms such as an insect pupa or an embryo in amniotic fluid. These living creatures, which gradually assumed a more human form, gained a sense of independence in wooden sculptures that recalled a baby rising to its feet, and while posing universal questions regarding the source of life in exhibitions such as Little Boy (curated by Murakami Takashi and held at the Japan Society in New York and other venues in 2005), and the International Art Exhibition in the 52nd Venice Biennale in 2007, Kato displayed a grand worldview that seemed to peer into the abyss of the human condition.

Whether in his paintings or sculptures, Kato’s human figures have bloated heads and abdomens and they are out of proportion with each other, resembling a fetus that has merely increased in size while retaining its original form. They also recall some kind of organism that has passed through the evolutionary process without differentiating itself from vegetation or the earth. In recent years, Kato has begun to make works that seem to depict families consisting of men, women, and children. But as these figures maintain a sense of anonymity and never suggest a specific person, they convey the artist’s inexhaustible interest in human existence. Using a rubber spatula or his hand rather than a brush, Kato creates pictures that exude a strong color contrast with an undertone of dark brown. They possess the power, eeriness, and crudeness of an indigenous magic sculpture and embody a universal artistic practice that refuses to be packaged in the palatable trends of the current era.